Donna's Writings

01/27/2017

Resistance Update 1/27/17

What a week! I have been on an emotional roller coaster, but I’m here to say that I’m ending the week on a high note. We are making history. We are the resistance. We are the future! Here’s a look at what happened this week and what new knitting activism you can sign up for moving forward.

What Happened

First up–the Women’s March on Washington was three times the size of the inauguration crowd and it was a mass of pink pussyhats. Not only that, but the pink hats filled the streets around the world. As many as 5,000,000 people marched for equal rights and to begin the resistance against the Trump administration. (Up to 20,000 people showed up in Montpelier, VT, including Bernie Sanders, who said it was the biggest crowd he’d ever seen at the statehouse.) There were so many pussyhats, that they’ve made national news and are featured on the covers of Time Magazine and the New Yorker (next week). One knitting shop in Franklin, Tennessee, The Joy of Knitting, asked, in a very hostile manner, that people who support the “disgusting and vile” women’s movement not buy pink yarn from her. Another shop in Virginia, Finch Knitting + Sewing Studio, received a letter with a not-so-veiled threat from a unknown group who claimed to be compiling a list of stores that are “are openly hostile to customers who voted for Donald Trump.” The internet exploded. Lots of knitting groups, on their own or working with local shops like A Verb for Keeping Warm in Oakland, California, have started political activism get togethers.
@avfkw on Instagram: Our first action meeting at Verb! Viva la resistance! We came together to paint postcards to send to our representatives. And to send postcards to those we love and admire. Gotta keep the balance! We created committees of action based upon themes which speak to our hearts like immigration, pp, the environment, education, and more. We are meeting every Thursday from 6:30-7:30. Join us! #strongertogether #womensmarch #mobilize #organize
And for general news:

What You Can Do Next

Keep Knitting and Wearing Pussyhats. The resistance is just beginning. By wearing your pussyhat around town, you can start conversations, find like-minded people, and make the resistance visible.
  • There are also lots of people who still don’t have–but want–pussyhats. People keep asking me to make more. How many more are you planning to make?
  • There are more marches, too. I’m marching on the 2017 Roe v Wade Day of Action in support of Planned Parenthood in Montpelier, VT on January 31st. I bet there’s something going on by you, too. Find out. Not every march has to be the biggest one ever. They’re all important.
Make Black Lives Matter Hats. My Resist Hat pattern in Knitting as a Political Act (free) includes a chart for “black lives matter” and many knitters are also making plain black hats. Check out the BLF206 March On Seattle 2.0 Yarn Army group on Facebook, or look in your local area for a Black Lives Matter group to support. White knitters, this means you! Show up and march, too. Make Resistance Mittens. There are patterns for mittens that you can make to go with your pussyhat or Resist hat on Ravelry. Check out the Women’s March Mittens by Catherine Clark and the Peace de Resistance Mittens by Bristol Ivy. Spread the Love and the Science. If you want small projects to make, I suggest you make little hearts or snowflakes, and pin them up on bulletin boards around town with small signs about science, climate change, diversity, human rights, women’s rights, or whatever issue stokes your fire the most. I’m doing this at the grocery store, coffee shop, post office, and public library. There are lots of patterns for both on Ravelry. Start or Join an Activist Group. If you’re inspired by what the knitters are doing at A Verb for Keeping Warm in Oakland, California, start your own group. The Indivisible Guide will give you all of the information you need. And if you prefer to join another group, even if it’s not all knitters, you can enter you zip code on the site and find the group closest to you. And keep calling and sending post cards to your reps. (You can email them and comment on Facebook too, but they pay the most attention to phone calls.)

I Love Us!

I am SO proud of all of the knitters and crocheters, designers, dyers, and yarn shops that are standing up to the forces of hate. It’s not a partisan issue. It’s not about being Democrat or Republican any more. It’s about humanity and the life of our planet. We are all in this together.
Subversive Knitting
7 Comments
  1. Just stumbled across you here as I was googling “Knitting for the Resistance” photos. I’m still knitting pink pussyhats, but also making them in green and blue for the Climate March and the Science March. I may even combine tail ends of green and blue skeins into green/blue hats. I just like knitting!

  2. We need to keep watch for the March for Science, coming up soon! Find out if pink hats, green hats, brain hats are hat of the day then : )

    • Yes! April 29, right? It’s starting to look like it’s gonna be a big one with rallies all over the country. I think I will make a Resist hat. The brain hats are hysterical but a bit much for me!

  3. You and Robert Reich are my go to people to keep informed.

    Thank you so much!

  4. Thank you for telling us about Rebecca Solnit’s work in the Guardian and Robert Reich’s nightly video on Facebook. I’m just a Raveller, not a Facebooker, so I’d not known about Reich’s talks. He really is inspiring. As are you, my dear. Thank you for your great energy and willingness to put yourself out there on these issues, in this difficult time.

  5. Three family members and I flew across the country to march (from Seattle to D.C.) We proudly wore your beautiful (and incredibly well-fitting) Resist hat. Thank for your creativity, generosity, and moral exhortations. Yesterday I purchased hand-dyed pink fingering yarns. I plan to incorporate your excellent design on the socks I will be wearing and gifting until our national nightmare ends.

    P.S. Your clever geometric “resist” pattern had an added layer of meaning for me: My late father was an engineer (JPL) and taught me the symbol when I was very young. Thank you,

    Toni

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