Donna's Writings

03/29/2012

Lesson: Sewing Seams

A lot of knitters are afraid of sewing seams, but it’s actually quite simple once you learn when to use each type of sewing technique. Here are the three that I use most frequently.


 

Whip Stitch Seam

Whip stitch is an easy seam that can be used anytime you have a furry yarn where the stitches won’t show.

1. With the right or wrong sides of the fabric facing up (your choice), place the two pieces to be seamed on a flat surface.

2. With a tapestry needle and matching, use one smooth motion to catch the stitch on the edge of one piece of knitting and then catch a stitch on the other piece.

3. Continue along the seam, pulling gently on the yarn to close the seam after each stitch.


 

Mattress Stitch Seam

Mattress stitch is an invisible seam that is sewn on the RS of the knitting.

1. With the right sides facing up, place the two pieces to be seamed on a flat surface.

2. With a tapestry needle and matching yarn, go under the bar between first and second stitches near the edge of one piece of knitting

3. Repeat step 2 on the other piece.

4. Continue to work from side to side, pulling gently on the yarn to close the seam after every few stitches.

After you gently tighten the stitches, they will disappear completely between the two pieces of knitting (not shown here). Don’t pull the seam too tight, you you will create a weak point. The seam should be at similar tension to the knitting.

 


 

Edge to Edge Seam

This seam is used to join cast-on or bound-off edges.

1. With the right sides of the fabric facing up, place the two pieces to be seamed on a flat surface.

2. With a tapestry needle and matching yarn, catch the knit V just inside the edge of one piece of knitting.

3. Repeat step 2 on the other piece.

4. Continue to work from side to side, pulling gently on the yarn to close the seam after each stitch.

The seam should be at the same tension as your knitting, and look like a row of stockinette stitch.

 


 

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